Friday, April 7, 2017

F - Flanders Fields, Belgium

Yesterday, April 6, marked the 100th Anniversary of America's entry into World War I.  This post is dedicated to all the men and their families who lost so much in the Great War.


By Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead: Short days ago,
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved: and now we lie
In Flanders fields!
Take up our quarrel with the foe
To you, from failing hands, we throw
The torch: be yours to hold it high
If ye break faith with us who die,
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields

Composed at the battlefront on May 3, 1915
during the second battle of Ypres, Belgium

Ramscappelle Road Military Cemetery - There are many photos on this site and more explanation





The Stone of Remembrance
Do you have an interest in visiting battlefields and commemorative sites?  Have you visited many?

Bonus:  Daylily 'Frosted Vintage Ruffles'

29 comments:

  1. Thank you thank you for this post.

    I've been to many American Revolution and Civil War battlefields, and Arlington national cemetery. Solemn places, they put me in a contemplative mood.

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    1. I too have visited many here. The European memorials tend to be quite spectacular.

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  2. Very nice. I am familiar with the poem, but I've never been to Flanders.

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  3. Denise, this post brought back memories. I have never visited a battlefield or memorial, but we studied this poem in college, as part of my Literature coursework. I remember we were all touched when our teacher spoke about this poem.

    Faamiti and Forelsket: Exotic Words with no English Equivalent

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    1. My father was stationed in India during WWII. I would think there must be memorials in cities there.

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  4. Yes and this poem was written by a Canadian! It's also when our nation became a true nation with the battle of Ypres. I would love to visit battlefronts but have seen very few. I feel like these places are almost...holy which is strange since they were battle grounds. So many died at those spots which is why I think of them as places to be respectful

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    1. Even with all the tourists, they are very solemn. Belgium has many sites like this one.

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  5. Our village used to have a trip every year around November, but I don't think they've done it in a while. The loss of life is so sad.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings - Shapeshifters and Werewolves
    https://tashasthinkings.blogspot.co.uk/

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    1. I was born on November 11, so Remembrance Day was something I learned about at a very young age.

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  6. A very moving post. I have visited the World War I cemeteries while on a field trip in college. I have also been to places like where the Battle of Hastings was fought, and while those are also places of respect, something about these rows of white graves feels so much more real - it doesn't seem like it's very long ago.

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    1. I remember the first time I visited a Civil War battlefield in Virginia. I stood there and marveled at how brave you had to be to fight in an open field.

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  7. I went on a day trip to the battle fields of Belgium last Autumn. I remember just standing, thinking.

    The Fish Inn, Amble Bay

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    1. I was speaking at a cemetery for a Memorial Day service back in the early 90's. One of my sons wanted to go with me. After we left, he said that he had never known war time. A year or so later, the Gulf War broke out. No generation escapes.

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  8. Beautiful post. We lived in Belgium for many years and visited a lot of the memorial sites. Even in my teenage years, I was aware of and grateful for the great sacrifices that were made.

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  9. oooh, now I understand why Taffy Thomas' WWI Folktales book has the poppies and the cross on the cover...

    The Multicolored Diary: WTF - Weird Things in Folktales

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    1. And it is why veterans organizations sell red poppies for Remembrance Day.

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  10. As Birgit mentioned, this is dear to all Canadians and we wear red poppies on our lapels every November. I would have loved to visit FLanders Fields, but never had the chance. Thanks for sharing it here.

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  11. Very touching post.

    Calen~
    Impromptu Promptlings
    A to Z Challenge Letter F

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  12. I have not visited any battle fields, but I have seen several memorial sites around the Washinton, D.C. area.

    F is for Fascist Takeover of the US

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    1. The first time I saw the Vietnam Memorial it was late at night. I broke down in tears. Hard enough to walk through cemeteries in the daylight.

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  13. I was taken to a number of such burial sites in France but not being very old, I didn't really understand the significance. I have always loved that poem. Makes Flanders Fields really stay in the memory.

    Lovely lily. I was thinking about your garden yesterday. Do you grow any foodstuffs or just lovely flowers and such? Have a friend in Oz who grows lots of veg.

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    1. Over the years I have tried to grow many different veggies, but animals usually find a way to destroy them before harvest. If they eat flowers at least I do not have to go shopping for them.

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  14. This is a powerful post, and chilling. I am glad I happened by, Denise.

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  15. I love that poem. Very simple, very powerful.

    Dena
    https://denapawling.blogspot.com/

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  16. Beautiful pictures Denise - they really capture the essence of the place. I would love to visit the war cemeteries in Europe as so many Australians are buried there. There's a war cemetery not far from us here in the Scottish Highlands and there a three Australians among the graves - so sad that they ended their lives so far from home. Thanks for sharing.

    Pamela @ Highlands Days of Fun

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