Sunday, February 7, 2016

When Everything Becomes a Contest....

Who really is a winner?  When did everything become a race to the finish line?  Solve a puzzle online?  They'll tell you how faster you are and how many folks are faster.

I do the NYT crossword everyday.  I am a terrible typist.  That means that even if I immediately know the answer to the clue I am very likely to type it incorrectly and into the wrong spaces.  But if you look at the 'scores', there are folks who completed the Sunday puzzle in 'three minutes nine seconds'.  Really?  This is just a typing contest and who gives a ----?

And even if you are doing the puzzle without seeing how fast you can enter the answers, why is being the fastest so important?  Why can't we just enjoy sitting with a cup of coffee and taking our time?

At yoga class a few weeks ago we were reminded that yoga is not a contest to see who can get the asana (pose) exactly right.  One instructor always reminds us to 'mind our own mat'.  Being mindful of our bodies is very important.  How many of us (not me anymore) try to jump out of bed in the morning and race to start our day?  Me?  I do some movement and poses, like cobbler's pose, before I even get out of the bed.  Once on the side of the bed, I take my time getting up and am aware of my body as I do so.  Believe me when I say you are much less likely to fall if you take your time and pay attention to what you are doing.

When I worked in the hospital one of my friends was complaining that she had worked a weekend shift with a med tech from the South.  She said that she could crawl faster than the woman could walk.  But if the work is getting done and is distributed fairly, why is it so important to do it in a hurry?   As I get older I kinda like that laid-back Southern style (even though friends complain that I walk too fast, lol).

More and more I have learned to just appreciate enjoying life.  Watching the flowers bloom.  Taking a nap if I am tired.  Not worrying if the windows are spotless or that I missed some dust on a table.  I don't want to be that obsessive 'everything has to be perfect' person.

This is my life and I am not in a race to the finish line.  Think about it.

12 comments:

  1. You are so right Denise. Nothing to hurry for. However, when we were younger, things had to be done at more speed - don't know why, just how it was. I guess I have always been impatient about some things but not about others. As for crosswords, knowing some people can do them in a certain period of time tends to make me feel inadequate which is really not fair to me or others like me. These days I find life hurries along quite fast enough. Wish I could slow it down.

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    1. Well I was a little discouraged when I first saw those times until I realized that 'solving' and 'typing' are two different things.

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  2. We all seem to be in such a hurry to get nowhere. One guy passed me and really sped up as he drove past me and I was going over the speed limit! I caught up to him 30 seconds later at the traffic light. It seems it goes by quantity not quality. If the job is done and there was no rush then, what's the problem? I knew one person who was out with her husband for a nice afternoon. She wanted to walk fast to look around I guess. He stopped and was admiring the nice day. She asked him why he stopped and he told her he was relaxing. Her response (I am not kidding), was "Hurry up and relax."

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    1. Yup. I know folks just like that. They seem to think that if they only sleep six hours a night and are busy running around all day they are somehow more worthy than you are. I'm content to be a slacker at this point in my life.

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  3. When you think about the finish line that all of us face, it's hard to imagine why we are in such a big hurry! Thanks for the reminder to slow down.

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    1. Slow down and remember there is more to life than work.

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  4. I was a lot more in a hurry when I was young, and my husband was worse. He was one of those types that would speed up to a world class site, take a glance, and say "OK, next stop!" (I may have lingered for 10 or 15 minutes) Now, we both have slowed down enough to want to know the details. We can spend hours lingering in a place. We now take the tour if it is offered. I refuse to be timed. Will it really matter in the end? (and, don't visit my house if you want an example of great housekeeping.) Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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    1. I'm with you on the housekeeping. I have a friend who still keeps a schedule for household tasks. Phooey!

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  5. Great post Denise and so true. We need to enjoy every moment in life. The phrase 'Take time to smell the roses" is all about that...instead of being in such a hurry to race by everything in life we need to slow down and maybe take some of it in. It is difficult sometimes so we need to be reminded once in a while! Thanks for the reminder.

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    1. I've lost too many family and friends at a young age and I think that is why I am so conscious of slowing down to really enjoy life.

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  6. I'm glad you're like that. It makes sense. My mom is in her seventies, retired, and she's still obsessive about her housecleaning. Even though I helped as much as I could at Christmas, she wouldn't stop. I wish she'd just sit down and enjoy the visit once in a while, especially since I only see her once a year.

    It's just the three of us - who cares if there's a speck of lint on the counter?

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    1. I know someone so compulsive they worry about every weed in summer and every fallen leaf in the fall. Drives me crazy hearing about it.

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