Monday, January 18, 2016

Where Do I Begin?

There are some issues in life that it is just impossible to wrap your head around and put into words. For me, one of those issues is the water crisis in Flint, Michigan.  Yesterday, when I got my newspaper out of the box, I had to set it aside and do something else rather than read anymore about this crisis.

I am no fan of the Governor of Michigan.  I was extremely upset after his re-election in 2014.  Four years earlier I actually believed his rhetoric about transparency in government.  It wasn't long before the honeymoon was over for me.

But for all the issues I have had a problem with in his administration, (e.g. emergency managers, taxing pensions) nothing has been as upsetting and disgraceful as what he has done in Flint.  When I first heard that Flint was going off the Detroit water system and drawing its water from the Flint River, I was aghast.  The Flint River?  A river likely contaminated by discharge from factories over the years?   Even the General Motors plant wouldn't use the water.  What were they thinking?

Of course, the Governor was only thinking about the bottom line, like the true accountant he is.  I have news for you Mr. Snyder: you can't run government like a business.  As a customer of a local municipality, I cannot just go buy my city services elsewhere on a moment's notice.

I am no fan of Michael Moore, but when I put the paper down yesterday, I came into my office, sat at my computer, and signed the petition calling for the arrest and prosecution of the Governor.  At the very least he should do what staff members involved have done and resign.  How dare he say he cares about Flint?  If he did, this never would have happened.

The Governor is supposedly worth about $200 million if you can believe the internet.  So how about it Rick?  Before taxing the citizens of Michigan to pay for your mistakes in Flint, how about kicking in a few million to solve some of the problems there?

Here is an interesting interview with the Mayor of Flint.

16 comments:

  1. I have family in Michigan. Not in the Flint area though. I had no idea there was a water crisis. I only heard about the water crisis in California. Gosh, I hope things get better in Flint.

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    1. I visited the Art Museum there last year. Am wondering if I drank any of their water when I had lunch. I feel so bad for the residents.

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  2. Surely the water is not taken directly from the river and given to the residents. I assume it goes through a pumping station which would purify the water somewhat. Water only has to go through 11 ft. of earth or an equivalent to be purified.

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    1. Read the articles. The poorly treated water leeched lead from the pipes into the water.

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  3. I've been hearing about this for several weeks, thanks to Rachel Maddow. On her blog she lists various ways her viewers can help. What a disgrace. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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    1. Disgrace is a mild word for this tragedy.

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  4. So sad and tragic that these residents have been unknowingly consuming this contaminated water for so long. Thank goodness something is finally being done, but it shouldn't have happened in the first place.

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  5. I have heard about the water crisis in Flint and was wondering how this could have happened and, also, not something else to hit that city. Now I see why it happened and that is simply disgusting. That town needs Erin Brokovich

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    1. Sure needed somebody. The trouble was even when folks were complaining two years ago, they were being ignored. It will be interesting to see what the Governor's old emails have to say when they are released today.

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    2. Most of the good stuff was redacted.

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  6. My husband and I have been following this tragedy since it finally hit the mainstream news. Everyone is pointing fingers. Now that the emails have been released (I haven't read them yet), I hope people will be held accountable. No one likes to pay taxes, but adequate taxes and reasonable regulations are needed to run a city, a state, a country.

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    1. What people need to know is that when the decision was made to use water from the Flint River, the state emergency manager was in control. The city council had no authority to make any decision. The state is still trying to shift blame.

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  7. That sounds horrible, Denise. I really wish our politicians would start thinking long-term about protecting our water, air, wildlife and forests.

    In my city, a temporary blockage caused five million litres of raw sewage to pour into one of our rivers. It's really depressing.

    I hope your situation has a happy resolution.

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    1. The Flint issue is still in the headlines everyday, almost a month after my post.

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