Wednesday, April 27, 2016

W: Wright, Wilkie's Woman in White, Whitefish Bay

The first career path I ever seriously considered (after five years of voice and wanting to be a singer) was architecture.  In a bold experiment in the 1950's my junior high school hired a teacher and put together an all girls class in drafting.  I loved it.

I thought that this would be an exciting career. Unfortunately, when I discussed it with the instructor, he said it was a difficult career path for women, that firms did not want to hire someone who might get pregnant in the middle of a project and leave.  Hey, I was 12 and certainly not thinking about having babies.

I still love architecture and have been a member of the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust for many, many years.  I've traveled around the country and seen many Wright-designed  homes.  And I have books.  Lots and lots of books with a few pictured here.





At the start of this challenge I mentioned that I have often loaned out a book and then had to buy it again when it wasn't returned.

I had to do that with Wilkie Collins's 'The Woman in White'.  Published in 1860,  I read the book for the first time one hundred years later.  I absolutely loved it.  It was the first of the 'sensation novels' and his work out-sold his mentor, Charles Dickens, at the time of publication.  During this challenge, I have been re-reading it.  I finished it on Monday. Knowing the twists, but not remembering everything (it has been 56 years), has not made it any less enjoyable than the first time I read it.  And besides, this edition has all sorts of interesting info in appendices that the paperback I used to own did not.



Whitefish Bay National Forest Scenic Byway is in the Hiawatha National Forest in the Upper Peninsula.  If you are visiting Tahquamenon, then you are already here in the right area.  Or it would be part of your drive around Lake Superior.  Seventeen miles northwest of Whitefish Bay is where the Edmund Fitzgerald sank in 1975.

If you continue on up on Hwy. 123 going north and you are a fan of Steve Hamilton novels, you will arrive in Paradise.  Oh, and there is a lighthouse, too.  Check out the links.

14 comments:

  1. I'm pretty sure I would never have the patience for architecture :). It's such a shame about the sexism in the industry at the time. I have not read The Woman in White, sounds like a good book.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

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  2. I used to love to draw house plans when I was a girl. They were never to scale, but I liked creating different designs and imagining what they would look like if they were built.

    I read The Woman in White a gazillion years ago and loved it. I can see why you purchased another copy.

    Cheers - Ellen | http://thecynicalsailor.blogspot.com/2016/04/w-is-for-watch-nancy-drew-investigates.html

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  3. People are still telling little girls what professions they can and cannot choose, and it is sad... My mother and my grandmother designed our house together, and it is awesome :)

    @TarkabarkaHolgy from
    The Multicolored Diary
    MopDog

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  4. My mother was born in 1922. She wanted to be an archeologist. She ended up being a teacher (and a good one). I wanted to raise goats and have 6 children. And I did it! Along with other things.

    Finding Eliza

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    1. I always thought it would be cool to have a goat. Good for you.

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  5. I am not sure if I have read The Woman in White. I certainly read The Moonstone. But, a very long time ago. I too have re-purchased favourite books. One friend borrowed a whole set of books and she lent them to a cousin so ended up purchasing them for me.

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  6. I'm from that unenlightened time too, as you know, back when these arguments were made for women not being suitable for many professions - of course, all proven wrong. My best friend wanted to be a veterinarian. She ended up (not that it was bad, just wasn't her dream) being an elementary school teacher. By the way, thanks for the Edmund Fitzgerald earworm. Started as soon as I saw "Whitefish Bay" in your blog's title. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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    1. I'd forgotten about the Whitefish connection until I saw a show about it Monday night. You are welcome.

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  7. My husband went to school for drafting once...that's architecture-related, right? See, I don't even know!

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  8. My mom would have been excellent at being an architect. When she was a kid she would go into the forest and make house plans using pine needles...and she was only 6. In1979/80, she designed the addition to the house and when she went to get the permit, the man asked who did the design. When she said she did(quietly), he commended how well it was done. What a shame how much this was and is a man's world.

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    1. When I was appointed Treasurer in my Township, I was asked by a Trustee if I would take a pay cut. He reasoned that since my predecessor was single and I was married, I did not need to earn the same salary. State law prohibits the reduction of salary during a term of office, but I am sure if they could get away with it they would.

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  9. The Woman in White intrigues me now! I might have to seek it out!

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  10. The 'Woman in White'....I believe I've heard of it, but now curious to read. I love discovering old books. My husband wanted to be an architect but was told he better go into engineering if he wanted a good job. He still wishes he'd gone with his first interest. Despite that, he's been quite good at sketching remodeling projects over the years....from a drafting class he also took.

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    1. My middle son had a scholarship to study architecture at a local university. He decided he wanted to study criminal justice instead. While in college, he got a part-time job at a private country club. He is now their accountant and manages their IT department. You never know where you may end up.

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